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Fri 2nd March 2012

Where are help centres for male domestic violence victims?

Filed under: Domestic Violence — JohnPotter @ 8:58 am

On Tuesday, TVNZ ONE News screened an item: Male domestic violence victims speak out.

I couldn’t detect any actual news in the story, but there were some worthwhile comments:

Rob Surtees and Brad Martin, from Stopping Violence Services in Wairarapa, say violence against men is a significant problem.

“We mainly deal with men who are violent towards women and children, but there is a big need for men to receive some help around the violence they are receiving as well,” said Surtees.

They tried to set up a refuge centre for males in their community – but could not get the funding.

At the end of the piece however, and in their website article: Male domestic violence victims ‘have nowhere to go’ they say:

Help centres have been set up in Gisborne and Auckland to help male victims of domestic violence, however nothing is yet available in Wellington, and there are calls for more help to be made available nationwide.

But no contact details!

Does anyone know about the “Help Centres” they are referring to?

20 Responses to “Where are help centres for male domestic violence victims?”

  1. Greg says:

    I am really astonished why don’t we simply start rioting against those femenist and start a revolution to save our country? Do you think police or army will stop us? WRONG! They are men and they will support us and join us.
    Better live like a lion for one day instead of living like a rabbit for 1000 years. Time to stop the goverment corruption and destroying of our families and portraying the straight man as the enemy, no we will not turn into gays, you just envy us and want to destroy us and WE WILL FIGHT BACK because we are MEN OF NEW ZEALAND!
    For all men writing here, you really have to stop expressing your anger in a smooth and polite way, not anymore, you must realize that those feminist want you DEAD, yes, for them the good man is a DEAD MAN.
    We must start a revolution, a revolution that will never stop before hanging all those feminist in public, so those who funded those feminist avoid our country for the next 1000 years and realize that this country has real brave men who know how to protect their country and family from them.
    We are 2 islands, after we slaughter all those feminists we can protect our country and defend it against new world order pro feminists, those pro gay armies won’t be able to defeat us as their straight men citizens will help us too. Let’s end feminism once for all like we ended communism.

  2. Greg says:

    Islands, mountains, forests, remote place, we can be very well defended. Let’s do it guys.

  3. Greg says:

    Wanna be real strong against those feminists and be a real man?

    – Stop alcohol.
    – Stop smoking.
    – Stop any gas drink like pepsi and etc. (destroys your pineal gland, injects unecessary adreanlin)
    – Stop music (destroys your pineal gland, injects unecessary adreanlin)
    – Stop porn (have the same effect as cocaine on the brain, destroys your pineal gland, injects unecessary adreanlin)
    – Stop TV news and talk shows (injects unecessary adreanlin).
    – Play sports, maitain ideal weight through a calorie deficit method.

  4. Greg says:

    Another economical weapon idea:

    It is very known that bankers are the ones who funded feminism, they did it because they get financial benefits from it, 2 house mortgages are better than one and etc…

    So as men, we should try as possible to avoid using banking services and I mean loans, don’t get unecessary loans, never buy anything you don’t own its money now, start small, don’t fall into debt slave trap. When banks figure out that half of the society are avoiding them they will change these laws.

  5. Gwaihir says:

    One subtle way, once a year, Refuse to wear their white ribbon. I got into a major with one of their brain washed men. He assured me they were moveing to change to ALL family violence and that the Refuge would help men ……. Did I hear a Tui Ad?

  6. Paul Catton says:

    Dear John,

    There is a refuge for “Men with Families” in “South Auckland”.
    However, funding is not the issue.
    Funding is provided by me.
    The issue is, “Men with their Progeny”, getting out of an abusive relationship and utilizing this facility.
    We are not a half-way house for recipients of a Policing, Domestic Temporary Protection Orders.
    Understandably there should be facilities to accommodate this scenario.

    I have documented precedent and there are vast recorded tomes available that show more than slanted views, from many levels of both public and governmental institution, that the notion that a “Father with his Children” requires help, falls upon deaf ear.

    I remain as always,

    Paul Catton
    South Auckland Refuge for Men with their Families’
    (09) 269 4411

    P.S.
    Opal and I have purchased the property for the “Refuge” and now are not subject to any standard “Tenancy Regulation” of having to quantify person occupancy, which provided a barrier to the refuge being in existence.

  7. Popa Doc says:

    I am really surprise how the issue of male domestic violence is swept under the rug. We spend years learning how to be a father, and when we are the victims of abuse, we are critized. Reforms are necessary.

  8. Down Under says:

    In New Zealand we have the Axminster system where justice has long since perished and its dusty remnants are swept under the carpet along with every other female transgression.

  9. Hans Laven says:

    Good advice Greg, for men to look after their health and finances. That’s hard enough for most of us; protecting both from the ravages of feminist law is the next challenge.

  10. Gwaihir says:

    Very please to hear this Paul. Very many thanks. The next task is to publicise it, the operation will strain your resources. We all know the problem. We have the solution. How do we bring the two together?

  11. Alastair says:

    Paul you may like to Join the Facebook group “Positive Men” This fits well with its goals.

  12. MurrayBacon says:

    An English example of man injured by his petite wife, horrific photos of chest after operation to repair injuries, MurrayBacon

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2144305/Husband-relives-horror-moment-petite-blonde-wife-plunged-steak-knife-chest.html

  13. Ford says:

    #12..i use to live in wanganui next to a young maori couple..they got into a fight one night and she broke a glass and stabbed him in the arm with it..the cops told him the only reason he didnt get arrested was because he had the wound..i beleive he was removed for the night and she was left in the house to look after their kids..no charges laid

  14. golfa says:

    #13 Ford. Here’s a link to an episode of Police 10-7 that shows exactly the descrimination you’re talking about. It used to be on youtube but I can’t seem to find it …. funny that !

    http://menz.org.nz/2007/police-10-7-video-of-callout-for-female-offender/

  15. Ford says:

    i remeber that when it was on tv,,if it was male assaults female the wouldnt ask her if she wanted to press charges..the cops would press charges..my 1st name is craig..lol..but im a whitey

  16. Ivan Zverkov says:

    Our feminist dictatorship hurts women, because it decreases productivity of men, so all women have less to exploit. Women depend on men. All articles around us were invented and put in production by men. If men disappear, so will food, electricity and transport. And even the fattest woman will not survive more than one month.

    Feminism can’t increase exploitaton of men, only re-distribute from one woman to another, deemed more abusive. The only way women can exploit men more is to increase productivity of men. And feminists are decreasing it.

    Excerpt from test questions, Feminism 101

    What is the correct way to fight feminists and collaborators?

    1) Rifle
    2) Rifle butt
    3) Bayonet
    4) All of the above

  17. MurrayBacon says:

    Dear Ford #13, so the children were left with a known violent offender? Looks like the police were taking a huge gamble with the lives of the children? What a gamble, win – little or no gain, lose – the children could be injured or even worse. Children will only be protected when we can honestly face these situations and handle them based on the true evidence. MurrayBacon.

  18. Ford says:

    #17..the violent female offender was the childrens mother..the father was removed for the night and the children left with her

  19. Ford says:

    #17..when my daughter was a baby she woke up approx 11pm and the x got up in a foul mood..had trouble settling baby down again and x cracked a mental and threw baby through the air and she landed in her cot..i got up and threatened to throw the bitch head first into a wall if she ever did that again..it came out in court that i had threatened x with physical violence which was true but as the courts and counselling is operated the reason ‘why’ things happen is not an issue to be discussed..’why’ is never the problem as far as they are concerned

  20. MurrayBacon says:

    New South Wales decides to provide services for men victims:
    from Greg Andresen.

    http://www.oneinthree.com.au/news/2012/8/31/male-victims-of-family-violence-face-gap-in-services-and-nee.html
    Male victims of family violence face gap in services and need special consideration: NSW Government report

    The NSW Government Legislative Council’s Standing Committee on Social Issues this week released their report on domestic violence trends and issues in NSW: the first ever to acknowledge the existence, needs, barriers to reporting and barriers to accessing support faced by male victims of family violence. According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics, more than 100,000 men in NSW have experienced violence from their partner.

    Greg Andresen, Senior Researcher for the One in Three Campaign said, “This courageous report heralds a new era of gender equity by the NSW Government by finally acknowledging the forgotten one-third of victims of family violence: men and boys.”

    The findings of the report include:

    “There was a broad recognition among inquiry participants that women offenders and male victims do exist” (p.218). “Of [reported] victims of domestic assault in 2010, 69.2% were female, while 30.8% were male.” (p.28)
    “Male victims have been much less visible and able to access supports than should be the case” (p.xxiv)
    “The experience of [males]… is equally as bad as that of other victims” (p.xxxii)
    Recognising “the gap in services for male victims and [encouraging] the government to examine how services can most appropriately be provided to male victims of domestic violence” (p.xxxii)
    Identifying males as “in need of special consideration with regard to domestic violence,” along with Aboriginal people, older people, people with disability, and several other population groups (p.89).
    Mr Andresen said, “We are especially pleased the Committee has recommended that the entire system for preventing and responding to family violence needs to take account of, and be effective for, all victims and perpetrators: not just women and children victims and male perpetrators as has been the case up until now.”

    “The Committee has also advised the Government that legislation and policy should be written in gender neutral terms – something we have been advocating for some time. They have also strongly recommended that male victims and female perpetrators be addressed in the Government’s forthcoming Domestic and Family Violence Framework.”

    “Until now, the Government’s entire specific support for male victims and their children has been a single page on their domestic violence website. Men have been unable to access the Government’s Start Safely and Staying Home Leaving Violence programs. They have been denied access to safe rooms and legal assistance at court as well as emergency accommodation for themselves and their children. They have also been absent from the National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and Children.”

    “We look forward to seeing the Report’s recommendations implemented by the NSW Government, and to working with them to ensure that each element of the criminal justice system, as well as the range of support services, is sensitive to the needs of all victims of family violence” said Mr Andresen.

    MEDIA CONTACTS

    Andrew Humphreys, Spokesperson, One in Three Campaign, 0418 378 568 or stanon@bigpond.com

    Greg Andresen, Senior Researcher, One in Three Campaign, 0403 813 925 or info@oneinthree.com.au

    Download a PDF version of this media release from here.

    SUBMISSIONS AND TRANSCRIPT

    The One in Three Campaign’s submission to the Inquiry can be found here (PDF). The Campaign appeared before the Inquiry on 20th February 2012. You can read the transcript here (please refer to pages 16-24), and our Questions Taken on Notice, Supplementary Questions and Additional Information here.

    QUOTES

    Notable quotes from the Committee’s Final Report include:

    “there are male victims and female perpetrators” (p xxi)
    “the system for preventing and responding to [domestic] violence needs to take account of, and be effective for, all victims and perpetrators” (p xxi)
    “some women perpetrate domestic violence and… some men are victims” (p xxiv)
    “male victims have been much less visible and able to access supports than should be the case” (p xxiv)
    “while it is important that some groups’ access to women’s refuges improve, for others, most especially male victims, it is more appropriate that alternative emergency accommodation be provided via brokerage services administered by a relevant support service.” (p xxxi)
    “there are male victims of domestic violence” (p xxxii)
    “While men are less likely to be victims [than women], the experience of those that are is equally as bad as that of other victims” (p xxxii)
    “We recognise the gap in services for male victims and encourage the government to examine how services can most appropriately be provided to male victims of domestic violence, including via brokerage funds” (p xxxii)
    “We make recommendations in Chapters 2, 4, 5 and 6 that we expect will achieve better recognition and responses to male victims” (p xxxii)
    “We also note our strong endorsement in Chapter 4 of the Auditor-General’s recommendation that the forthcoming DFV Framework establish mechanisms to continually address both barriers to reporting and barriers to accessing supports. Once again, we see male victims as an important group here, and actively encourage the government in this task.” (p xxxii)
    “Of victims of domestic assault in 2010, 69.2 per cent were female, while 30.8 per cent were male.” (p 28)
    “some women perpetrate domestic violence and… some men are victims, and also… male victims have been much less visible and able to access supports than should be the case. We consider that the system for preventing and responding to domestic violence needs to take account of, and be effective for, all victims and perpetrators, and we address this further in Chapter 4 concerning the forthcoming NSW Domestic and Family Violence Framework, Chapter 5, concerning prevention and early intervention, Chapter 6, concerning services for victims, Chapter 10 concerning legal representation for respondents in ADVO matters, Chapter 11 regarding legal services for victims, Chapter 14 on sentencing and penalties, and Chapter 15 on perpetrator programs.” (p 31)
    “legislation and policy should be written in gender neutral terms” (p 31)
    “In addition to male victims, a number of population groups were identified during the inquiry as in need of special consideration with regard to domestic violence” (p 31)
    “we… recognise that there are female perpetrators and male victims… It is important that… these… be addressed in the forthcoming DFV Framework” (p 57)
    “[men are one of the] population groups identified as in need of special consideration with regard to domestic violence” (p 89)
    “many victims’ services are women specific” (p 155)
    “there are male victims of domestic violence. While men are less likely to be victims, the experience of those that are is equally as bad as that of other victims. We recognise the gap in services for male victims and encourage the government to examine how services can most appropriately be provided to male victims of domestic violence, including via brokerage funds.” (p 156)
    “the forthcoming DFV Framework needs to take account of and be effective for all victims and perpetrators. Correspondingly, our Recommendation 5 was that the Framework be inclusive of both genders.” (p 156)
    “we envisage that our Recommendation 24, for universal primary prevention strategies focusing on violence against women to be complemented by strategies targeting specific population groups, would necessarily address violence against men.” (p 156)
    “in relation to Recommendation 30, which calls for an expansion to brokerage funds, that these would be an appropriate way to respond to the emergency accommodation needs of male victims. It is foreseeable that there would be other needs that brokerage funds can address for this group.” (p 156)
    “in order to improve male victims’ access to victims services, we also consider that the needs of male victims would be an important focus of the responses to Recommendation 20 in Chapter 4, to improve victims’ awareness of domestic violence services, with particular attention to the needs of specific population groups.” (p 156)
    “we note our strong endorsement in paragraph 4.146 of the Auditor-General’s recommendation that the forthcoming DFV Framework establish mechanisms to continually address both barriers to reporting and barriers to accessing supports. Once again, we see male victims as an important group here, and actively encourage the government in this task.” (p 156)
    “there was a broad recognition among inquiry participants that women offenders and male victims do exist. Each element of the criminal justice system, as well as the range of support services, needs to be sensitive to the needs of both groups. It is important to ensure that these systems are resourced and equipped to respond appropriately.” (p 218)

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