- promoting a clearer understanding of men's experience -


MENZ.org.nz Logo First visit to MENZ.org.nz? Here's our introduction page.
MENZ ISSUES

MENZ Issues: news and discussion about New Zealand men, fathers, family law, divorce, courts, protests, gender politics, and male health.

Wed 11th September 2013

Flexible working roles for men

Filed under: General — Downunder @ 1:53 pm

Yes, here we have it guys, it’s definitely in the bottom line of this article.

“Leadership talent is in short supply in New Zealand and globally. Yet at every successive management level significant proportions of talented women drop out or their career stalls. This is the leaking talent pipeline,” it says.

Who are the authors of this project to promote the interests of women in the New Zealand working world? Tax-payer funded Ministry of Women’s affairs, of course.

Article: http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/politics/9143952/Flexible-working-for-men-suggested

Employers should offer men flexible working options if they want to boost the woeful tally of women business leaders, a new Government report says.
Reducing the stigma of flexible working by getting all managers and employees to value it could stop it being thought of as the “mummy track” and “career suicide”.
The Ministry of Women’s Affairs has released a report on patching the leaky pipeline of female talent, drawing on overseas research and ideas from a panel of New Zealand diversity and leadership experts.
It says all workers should be offered clear and transparent flexible working options to reduce the stigma and career cramping that can come with juggling work and small children.
The report, Realising the Opportunity, pulls research from Australia, Britain and elsewhere and focuses on three factors that hamper women: unconscious recruitment bias, career breaks and flexible working.
It says flexible working would carry less resentment and more prestige if all workers were offered it.
Studies showed flexible working benefited employers and 80 per cent of workers were interested in it – including options such as working part-time, job sharing, flexi time, compressed hours, or extended unpaid leave for school holidays.
But often it was offered formally only to mums, or used on an ad hoc basis, and other workers feared being left to “pick up the slack”.
On top, women and others working different or restricted hours missed out on networking opportunities and high visibility projects and could be seen as less committed, the authors said.
But if flexible working was widely used and accepted – including by senior managers – people would be able to use it without suffering a career hit.
Women often trade down jobs after taking time off to rear children or sacrifice prestige for family-friendly arrangements.
They are sometimes seen as less dedicated and given more routine work and fewer career-advancing projects, making withdrawing from their career track even more attractive, according to research cited in the report.
Of the three barriers to women’s advancement, unconscious basis is the trickiest to solve, the report says. Unconscious bias is when people judge women leaders more harshly and see female traits as less compatible with leadership despite evidence men and women perform equally well, it says.
Ironically the same bias often punishes women who exhibit so-called “masculine” traits for being too aggressive.
Other suggestions in the report include raising awareness of unconscious bias – including a tendency by male managers to promote “mini-mes” – and using mixed-gender recruitment panels, manager training and transparent performance-related criteria to trip up people’s unconscious assumptions.
A “critical mass” of 30 per cent senior women seems to improve other women’s chances of advancing, it suggests.
Other ideas for boosting women’s chances include helping talented women return to good jobs by providing money and technology to help them stay in touch with colleagues while on career breaks, organising catch-up meetings with managers, and offering refresher programmes before women come back.
It says chief executives must take charge of efforts to promote women if they are going to be effective.
The ministry says it still needs more New Zealand-specific information and is asking people to share their experiences.
“Leadership talent is in short supply in New Zealand and globally. Yet at every successive management level significant proportions of talented women drop out or their career stalls. This is the leaking talent pipeline,” it says.

9 Responses to “Flexible working roles for men”

  1. Skeptic says:

    This is pure matronizing hokum.it belittles women as well as men.
    There isn’t a short supply of leadership, only many women CHOOSING to prioritize family connection over the paid workplace, AND benefiting from flexi-time by generous employers who allow it for them.
    I wouldn’t waste time trying to explain that to the paranoid zealots who live in their mythical land of ‘patriarchy’ at the misery of wimmin afears though.

  2. Downunder says:

    How can men have flexible working hours anyway?

    That would reduce the amount of child support they were paying then the IRD would assess their child support to a higher amount and they would have to work full time again otherwise they would have nothing to live on.

    How many men in New Zealand already have a child-support debt and/or assessed child support and couldn’t work flexible hours anyway?

    What about the contract workers that already do this and accumulate more debt everytime they are between contracts?

  3. hornet says:

    This is yet another of the many attacks on the integrity of FAMILY – they do not want you to be a FULL TIME PARENT

    We have already seen the latest changes to social welfare to force a parent to work at least part time – in order to collect a benefit.

    Another loop hole not closed – means they have to create a system which offers part time work to both parents – male or female – this then opens the door for them to stamp on you if you choose not to work and be a full time PARENT –

    What this then means – they can then say – well you COULD WORK PART TIME and earn $$$ – so we will assess your EARNING POTENTIAL at that level – whether you work on NOT – you see this is all a manipulation to allow the state to claim more from you, whether you earn it or not.

    There is an AGENDA across NZ to dissolve the FAMILY unit, to force parents into placing kids into child care as early as possible, they have over the last two decades, already forced BOTH parents to work for the wage which ONE PARENT used to earn for a family.

    My daughter is Five and just received an IRD tax number – does that tell you something – I find this OFFENSIVE. A kid of five should not have to receive a TAX number – what the hell is this place becoming?

    Now what they need is the ability to totally remove both parents from their right to PARENT – by demanding you could work part time whether you chose to or not.

  4. hornet says:

    And why dont we see an article, detailing the many businesses that are destroyed in this country, by family court lawyer parasites, and matrimonial property laws which fail to protect small businesses and the many people they employ.

    I am sure we can all recount stories of businesses and owners /managers destroyed because a greedy narcissistic parasite wants CASH NOW, without any care for the future of that business or the staff it employs. Over the years this has impacted massively on the NZ economy.

    Why dont they publish statistics on the numbers of people – males predominantly who are destroyed by the family court system, have their reputations and character destroyed, and have their earning potential decimated by that process for the benefit of lawyers only.

    No parent wins in family court, and certainly there must be a running list of many small businesses which have been destroyed because of greed and a refusal by any government to offer some form of protection to businesses and their owner /managers and staff. Wow that would be some list.

  5. Downunder says:

    Think of all the people who have seen this happen and said

    “I’m not going to put myself in that position and pissed off overseas.”

    Imagine the calculation of potential growth to the economy destroyed by the insane feminists running the IRD.

    That’s why we can’t ‘afford’ superannuation – because of the damage to economy because women have to get what they want.

  6. Pretty in Pink says:

    I’ve always believed in the ‘the best way to convince someone they are wrong, is to let them do it their way’ philosophy. Classic example of this, was the handing of ‘white’ farms to ‘black farmers’ in Zimbabwe. Robert Mugabe still won’t accept he was wrong, but shit – the whole world knows it. The hard evidence is there.
    So I say, OK, lets push all the men out from management into lower paid menial jobs. Give full control to women. That’s right. All of it.
    And then wait to see how long it is before
    (1) all men are unemployed; I mean, come, on, if we men all walk away from hardlabour high risk industries, all hell will break loose.
    (2) Men start leaving NZ en masse.
    (3) women (leftist labourites) start getting power hungry, and start spending company money on themselves. After all, I’m entitled to a fast red Ferrari, ahead of company profits and long-term investment;
    (4) Companies start collapsing, and along with them, the entire economy.

    Anyone remember the fairy tale “the fisherman and his wife”?
    Anyone remember Teresa Gattung?

  7. CosmicKeys says:

    Does anyone have the actual report? I can’t find it on the MoWA website.

  8. CosmicKeys says:

    Uh! no idea how I missed that – cheers.

Leave a Reply

Please note that comments which do not conform with the rules of this site are likely to be removed. They should be on-topic for the page they are on. Discussions about moderation are specifically forbidden. All spam will be deleted within a few hours and blacklisted on the stopforumspam database.

Since May 2019 this site is cached. Comments will not appear immediately unless you are logged in. Please do not make multiple attempts.

« »

Powered by WordPress

Skip to toolbar