- promoting a clearer understanding of men's experience -


MENZ.org.nz Logo First visit to MENZ.org.nz? Here's our introduction page.
MENZ ISSUES

MENZ Issues: news and discussion about New Zealand men, fathers, family law, divorce, courts, protests, gender politics, and male health.

Tue 8th April 2014

Brenda Pilott Engineering Domestic Violence Research

Filed under: Domestic Violence,Gender Politics,General — Downunder @ 4:24 pm

Brenda Pilott

It is becoming increasing obvious that PSA secretary Brenda Pilott is actively involved in engineering ‘domestic violence in the workplace’ research to support changes to employment law.

Apart from what has been produced by Suzanne Snively (previously posted here) this is the only other New Zealand ‘research’ that I have found.

A thesis ‘The Impacts of Domestic Violence on Workers and the Workplace’ submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Public Health (MPH), The University of Auckland, 2013 by Margaret Michelle Rayner-Thomas.

A self-report questionnaire modified from the Australian Domestic Violence Workplace Rights and
Entitlements Project (McFerran, 2011a) was distributed by the New Zealand Public Service
Association (PSA) to 10,000 randomly selected members. A total of 1,626 valid responses were
received (16% response rate). The data provided was descriptive and was compared using chi-square
analysis according to age, gender, sector of the PSA, employment type, and employment role.

The PSA is the country’s biggest union with a make up of 70% Woman, the valid responses mentioned above were 75% women.

This thesis draws on other research to support the following view:

Estimates vary, but overwhelmingly, domestic violence is perpetrated by men against women.

(Flood, 1999; Flood, 2006; Garcia-Moreno, Jansen, Ellsberg, Heise, & Watts, 2006; Khan, 2000; Kimmel, 2002;
UNICEF, 2001; Watts & Zimmerman, 2002).

Naturally women are excused for their violence toward men:

Women’s violence towards men tends to be resistant violence that occurs
either in self-defence or in retaliation to abuse she is experiencing at the hands of her male partner,
while men’s violence against women tends to involve more acts of terrorism, control, and extreme
violence (Johnson, 2006).

Where is all this headed:

There is a case to be made in New Zealand for legislation on the basis discrimination. The Human
Rights Act (1993) makes discrimination because of specific attributes (gender, sexual orientation,
race, family status) illegal. Such legislation could offer protection for workers under the auspices of
one of the protected classes. Some researchers have suggested that employers be held liable if they
have not taken action to ensure a victim of domestic violence is safe while at work and an incident
of domestic violence occurs since it has a clear gendered component (Johnson & Gardner, 1999).
Another option is to expand the attributes covered in the Human Rights Act to include ‘victim of
domestic violence’ as a protected group.

Watch out for Green’s List MP Jan Logie and her member’s bill

This Bill is an omnibus Bill. It amends the Domestic Violence Act 1995, Employment Relations Act 2000, Health and Safety in Employment Act 1992, Holidays Act 2003, and Human Rights Act 1993 with a view to enhancing legal protections for victims of domestic violence.

5 Responses to “Brenda Pilott Engineering Domestic Violence Research”

  1. […] The Human Rights Commission is happily engaged in supporting the PSA’s feminised shipwreck and discrimination in the workplace by PSA secretary Brenda Pilott. […]

  2. […] a recent post (Brenda Pilott Engineering Domestic Violence Research) Menz disclosed New Zealand’s latest research collaboration between the New Zealand Public […]

  3. […] know what flags Helen Kelly and Brenda Pilott fly and with Pilott having a pivotal say in New Zealand’s largest union which is 70% women […]

  4. How does one justify a ‘Womens Network’ within a Union (PSA) which is 70% women?

    A case may only be made for a ‘network’ when that ‘network’ is less than 20% and a better case when that network is less than 10%. And i hope that all funds poured into the network are fully disclosed on the unions annual publicised accounts.

  5. […] it came to the election build up this year, we saw the usual doggy research promoting the usual doggy legislation and it looked like business as usual, until party leader David Cunliffe opened the campaign with […]

Leave a Reply

Connect with Facebook

Please note that comments which do not conform with the rules of this site are now likely to be removed. They should be on-topic for the page they are on. Discussions about moderation are specifically forbidden.

Notify me of followup comments via e-mail. You can also subscribe without commenting.

« »

Powered by WordPress