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Ruth Dyson on Fathers

Filed under: General — Downunder @ 9:01 pm Thu 30th August 2007

I am pleased the Families Commission report into paid parental leave has
sparked a nationwide debate. Research has shown New Zealand parents have
benefited from our Labour-led government’s Paid Parental Leave scheme and
are eager to contribute ideas to improve and extend the scheme.

“Our government will look at four different areas where the scheme could
be improved – the 10 per cent of women in paid work who currently miss out
on any payment at all, the level of money that people get, the length of
time, and the fact that few fathers access the scheme at the moment.”

I hesitate to ask what the word “Father” might mean in Dykson’s Dictionary, but you can tell Labour is short of a vote when “Father” enters her vocabulary.

8 Responses to “Ruth Dyson on Fathers”

  1. MikeT says:

    Research has shown New Zealand parents have
    benefited from our Labour-led government’s Paid Parental Leave scheme and
    are eager to contribute ideas to improve and extend the scheme.

    Research by who?.
    Statistics can be screwed around to show anything.
    Who the hell is this bitch trying to kid ?.
    Well Mizzz Dyson, have you thought about the Dole Queue that you’ll be standing in after the next election?

  2. Scrap_The_CSA says:

    I don’t doubt that paid parental leave benefits some women. Where are the thinking journalists asking the question why are fathers treated as inferoir by the families commission? Why does Ruth Dyson support less paid parental leave for fathers than mothers?

    Is their a thinking journalist in this country?

    Kids have two parents and surely it is only just and fair that
    both mum and dad receive equal paid parental leave provisions.

    If it was proposed that kiwi dads got 12 moths paid parental leave and mums got one month would the outcry be deafening?

  3. Rob Case says:

    I’m sure this point has been raised before, but isn’t Ms Dyson admitting to failure when the state feels obliged to assist parents to have and raise their own children?

    People used to raise larger families off the income of a single earner. Not that long ago either.

    We’ve let the state have an increasing role in our lives on the promise that it would alleviate those unpleasant aspects of life, such as poverty, crime and hopelessness, and it has done no such thing. All these blights are still with us. Crime is worse, neighbourhoods in poverty are expanding and hopelessness, if suicide is any indicator, hasn’t gone anywhere.

    Yet the prescription is for more of these government ‘solutions’.

    Who believes all this stuff?

  4. dad4justice says:

    What would dyke dyson know about fathers . Her days living in a hippy town with her girlfriends in the backblocks of Buller is a better yarn , eh Ruth , Ruth can’t tell the truth .

  5. Benjamin Easton says:

    Rob,

    my time in access on the net is now pretty limited, yet of all these comments BLK apart, you fashion an argument that can be modelled into some form of direct challenge. That is to say your interest is less on reply but more comparing principle to object.

    This is to say that your point deals directly with social policy, patterns and effect. Bevan is still slow off the mark – aiming somewhere in the area he recognises to be discrimination and giving it a bit of an age old rark up: Scrap blames journalists, and even though he is right; if the journalists aren’t backed up by public opinion they will be the last (presently) to take any risk, and Pete, as ever is right on the mark of personal reality and a sexual surrender that by dysfunction directly discriminates against childhood (as if) reasonably disinheriting them (sons and daughters) of their association with fatherhood.

    Surely if we put it all together, after reading BLK, I haven’t – and we agree there is still a problem – then the collective energy building about present practices and the inability effectively to address the primary issues; will motivate everyone into one PROACTIVE direction? Surely?

  6. Scrap_The_CSA says:

    Scrap blames journalists,

    Ben, read what I write. I have not blamed journalists. I have asked where the thinking ones are and if there is a thinking journalist in the country.
    Questions do not equal blame Ben.

    Sorry Blk, I don’t buy into this tiny sample of dads as being representative of New Zealand dads.Recommending a parental leave policy on 13 months for women and 1 month for men based on the findings of this report is bananas.
    I say again why should a mother be entitled to 13 months of paid maternity leave and a father is only entitled to one months paid paternal leave. Correct me if i have misread the proposal.

    This is wrong. It devalues the role of fathers in the care of children and deprives them of financial support to enable them to equally care for their children instead all is given the mother.

    Dont get me wrong, IF this is going to happen I dont begrudge mums 13 months paid parental leave all I am say is that if mum gets 13 Months why not dad?

    Regards

    Scrap

  7. Benjamin Easton says:

    Simon Collins

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