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Who is Matt King

Filed under: General — Downunder @ 11:34 am Sat 21st May 2022

Matt King may be an unknown quantity to most people around the country but that is fast changing.

A former Northland MP and National Party (Member of parliament) for one term, King lost his Northland seat by the narrowest of margins in the 2020 election to Labour’s media-bomb campaign.

He parted ways with the National Party over Human Rights, mandates and bodily autonomy issues during the Covid emergency instigated by the sitting Labour government and questionable assistance from National.

King had been holding firm to the position of not having to disclose one’s health information to represent a point of view but at the insistence of Platform radio host, Michael Laws, this week, King disclosed his vaccinated status which according to Laws a former MP himself, would strengthen his case.

Well, perhaps? Do I need to disclose my health status to write this? Would it make me any more credible or would that also be compliance with Laws’ simplistic thinking – that somehow this would be ‘walking the walk’?

Let’s think about that. Is that just an ex-politician thinking about how to convince some people that King is not an anti-vaxer?

Laws gave him a good talking down to, as someone who had walked ahead of King as a politician … but that’s typical Laws. He’s an arrogant prick, well known for his divisive politics.

What is Matt King up to then?

As a former MP, amid the censorship and disruption and ousted from the National Party, King started doing interviews with people who held opposing views to the Government’s Emergency – that didn’t go down well at all but he was representing the great unwashed who would later support the parliament protest.

When the protest did erupt King initially wasn’t going to attend but someone told him to, “Get his scrawny arse down there” and do what he’s good at, talking to people and understanding the problem … because parliamentarians were refusing any dialogue with the protestors … and the short story; that led to a new political party, DemocracyNZ, fronted by King.

The country has been and still is in various states of desperation and I’m sure I’m not the only one who had a friend who didn’t cope with the covid trauma and ended their life.

That’s the extreme, of course but there’s many people who are disillusioned, fearful, desperate even, about the country’s future. Anyone who says, we are not currently in a political mess, is probably not paying too much attention.

At a time when many people need a bit of hope and for the lost and the lonely especially, a reason to love life again, King is out there with his current nationwide roadshow doing just that and not just promoting a new political party.

Show me anyone else who can match him at the moment.

He comes across as a genuine, approachable character, who means what he quietly says. The sort of person that would have been welcomed at Heart Politics 20 years ago, as his reputation wasn’t yet beyond repair, according to establishment standards, of course.

Is Matt King just being the bloke we wanted? A politician somewhat rendicent of last century’s political standards?

What’s his position on Men’s Rights issues? I have no idea but perhaps some readers might like to check out his road show timeline and attend a meeting.

But when it comes to a bottom line, and when we’ve had all the rhetoric about “Love and Kindness” being beaten into us by Ardern, is this the walk the PM just wasn’t capable of.

Is this walk the gaping hole in Ardern’s manufactured persona?

4 Responses to “Who is Matt King”

  1. DJ Ward says:

    I agree with your sentiment, that things don’t look good.
    And in conversations, others say similar things.
    I know nothing about Matt King, so can’t comment on him.
    But what I think is missing, is common sense.
    Where we get ideology, and strange thinking.

    https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/politics/opinion/300593806/robertson-may-have-bought-labour-some-time-but-budget-2023-will-need-to-do-a-lot-more

    Bought some time, is an understatement.
    So let look at, time.
    If they borrow $20 billion, what government could pay it off.
    A perfect government, would spend exactly what they earned.
    A government with a large surplus, takes to much.
    So politically even a surplus of a billion, is something to celebrate.
    Twenty years later, without interest the one year is paid for.

    I lament at such thinking, about government spending.
    Somehow it’s good taxing, then spending it all with benefits to taxpayers.
    All the bonuses paid with debt, spending rising 50% in no time.
    Yet the author, expresses they want more and then more.

    So then we get the inevitable, correction.
    Even if it’s a hard landing, there’s always a bottom.
    Ironically in hitting rock bottom, you get good foundations.

  2. john says:

    Now that Matt has had a few meetings it is worth checking out his fb postings and listening to his message .
    He has had great attendance and very positive feedback.
    He has a big chance of winning the Northland seat and thus getting in to parliament and maybe holding the balance of power.

  3. Downunder says:

    Our mainstream journalists would rather be on social media talking about Boris Johnson than at a grassroots meeting and not only DemocracyNZ but other organisations like Groundswell and TaxpersUnion are making the candidates in the Tauranga by-election look like kids in a sandpit at kindergarten.

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