MENZ ISSUES

MENZ Issues: news and discussion about New Zealand men, fathers, family law, divorce, courts, protests, gender politics, and male health.

CGTOW

Filed under: General — Downunder @ 11:22 am Thu 14th March 2019

This recent post MGTOW is a review of Men Going Their Own Way and how that might be now in New Zealand. The acronym only matters to those that write about the subject or those that relate to it. I’m creating a new acronym here but I’ll get to that shortly.

First let’s go back to the time when baby-boomers were of an age to start a family. It was a time of change when some women rather than leaving their career to care for a household and family were looking at other options. It was the age of the nuclear family. Mum, Dad, and two kids. (When our survival rate was considered to be 2.3 children)

It was the age of the totally planned lifestyle. These are your options for this. House ownership, life assurance, retirement funds, most of which was still done on a face to face basis. A lot has changed, and much like MGTOW, only those that relate to the change might write about this.

It was a chance encounter that made me consider this in respect of history; that what we read is written by an older generation because they can see change rather than by those relating to the contemporary.

And contemporary change when I was young, tended to be driven by commerce and technology, not ideology and politics.

Talking to an older baby-boomer couple recently, Mum and Dad, still married, who were the typical nuclear family with a pigeon-pair to boot (a common expression if the children were a boy and a girl) and I came away with a slightly different perspective.

Their two children now around thirty will not produce any grandchildren; another subject but something they have come to accept. But why?

Their daughter as most girls these days are, took an academic option and tertiary study. A student loan, a completed course didn’t provide employment, and a bigger loan to alter the qualifications to get employment.

Their son, as most boys these days, took an employment option, no student loan, lower wages, but by the time he’s paid for rent, transport and living expenses, that’s his budget gone, along with most of the future planning we considered manditory rather than optional.

So, both of these children have examined their circumstances and said, “We cannot afford children.”

Children in their mind are a financial consideration. Is it a realistic or coveniently used excuse? That’s the obvious question.

But this is Children Going Their Own Way (CGTOW)

In the MGTOW post I mentioned what I’ve read about the Japanese situation, that young men are remaining single and considered to be having a relationship with their phone. Now I’m wondering if that observation doesn’t consider the child’s position. Japanese girls can hire a fake boyfriend if they feel under pressure to consider marriage and children (to appease the parents).

NZ is perhaps a more secular rather than sacred society in comparison with Japan, yet their problem is considerably worse. Perhaps the only difference there is their resistance to immigration in terms of population management.

When you look at the historical perspective of Greece and Rome, we may not be doing ourselves any favours by making these comparisons when we should be considering the perspectives of the children.

Then again, one might ask, is it our own human intelligence that’s defeating civilization?

And the political; the next generation won’t have children to occupy them, so let their attention be directed toward us. Let them love us instead.

What do you think?

CGTOW 2

Leave a Reply

Please note that comments which do not conform with the rules of this site are likely to be removed. They should be on-topic for the page they are on. Discussions about moderation are specifically forbidden. All spam will be deleted within a few hours and blacklisted on the stopforumspam database.

This site is cached. Comments will not appear immediately unless you are logged in. Please do not make multiple attempts.

Skip to toolbar